Sneak Peek at TOC for More Cauliflower Please!

More Cauliflower Please! 15 Imaginative, Delicious Cauliflower Dishes Your Whole Family Will Love (Really!) available August 25th!

Pre-order the e-cookbook today at the special price of $4.99 – that’s 33 cents per recipe, a delicious bargain – and receive a special coupon for the forthcoming full-length book containing 30 recipes plus additional basics.

The Basics

How to buy, store, and cook cauliflower
Creamy Mashed Cauliflower
Oven-roasted Cauliflower
“Riced” Cauliflower
Cauliflower Tortillas
Cauliflower Pizza Crust
Creamy Cauliflower Sauce

Brunch or Lunch

Savory Cauliflower Cake or Muffins
Make-Ahead Sweet Italian Sausage and Cauliflower Strata
Cauliflower-Carrot Pancakes with Chive Pesto and Fried Egg

Soups & Sides

Coconut Curry Cauliflower Soup with Cauliflower Biscuits
Golden Beet and Cauliflower Soup with Croutons
Cauliflower-Leek Risotto with Micro Greens
Roasted Cauliflower Two Ways: Caramelized Figs, Shallots and Horseradish-Beet Sauce and Za’atar Cauliflower Relish

Entrees   

Caprese Pizza with Cauliflower Crust
Three-Cheese Truffled Dauphinoise de Chou-Fleur
Caramelized Cauliflower Arepa with Chicken, Plantain Crema Fresca and Spicy Raspberries
Crispy Coconut Lime Baked Cauliflower Lettuce Wraps with Crispy Shallots
Lemon-Lime Garlic Shrimp over Caramelized Cauliflower Caulipots

Dessert

Chewy Cauliflower Butterscotch Brownies
Chocolate Cauliflower Pudding
Nectarine-Ginger Cauliflower Flognarde

Learn more >>

My first eCookbook is available to pre-order!



gumroad-cauliflower-cover


Pre-Order Now

Hi, I’m Kelly and I’ve been a recipe developer for nearly a decade and a home cook for more decades than I’m willing to admit. Over the years, I’ve been asked many times to make my recipes available as cookbooks, so I’ve got two full-length cookbooks in the works. In the meantime, More Cauliflower Please! offers you a tiny taste of what goes on in my kitchen.

If you’d like to check out my hard work, the e-cookbook is available for pre-order at the special price of $4.99 – that’s 33 cents per recipe, a delicious bargain!

Why Cauliflower?

You’ve likely heard that a healthy meal should be colorful: red tomatoes, green peppers, purple cabbage, orange carrots… and that you should avoid any white or colorless foods. Compared to these vibrantly colored vegetables with their robust flavors, one might easily pass by cauliflower, but don’t write off this dowdy cruciferous just yet. Part of the brassica family, the pale and noble cauliflower contains antioxidants and phytonutrients that can protect against cancer, fiber that helps with satiety, weight loss and a healthy digestive tract, choline that is essential for learning and memory as well as many other important nutrients. Move over broccoli, cauliflower is the new superfood!

What’s Inside?

No boring cauliflower mash here! This family-friendly cookbook contains 15 easy-to-follow recipes sure to inspire even the pickiest eater to say “Yes please” to cauliflower. Starting with the basics, learn how to shop for, prepare and store cauliflower. Next, prepare roasted, “riced” and pureed cauliflower which can be served as is or be used as an ingredient in a variety of recipes. Ebook includes 15 original recipes: breakfast, lunch, soup & sides, entrees and dessert. Yes, that’s right dessert! I promise, you won’t even know there’s cauliflower in the dish. Your family and friends will be thrilled! Here’s a sneak peek of what the e-cookbook will include.

Order Now!

If you’d like to check out my hard work, the e-cookbook is available for pre-order at the special price of $4.99 – that’s 33 cents per recipe, a delicious bargain! BONUS: Order my ebook today and receive a special coupon and save on the forthcoming full-length book which will contain 30 recipes plus 7 basics!


Pre-Order Now

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For early access to my forthcoming cookbooks, I invite you to join my personal mailing list.


 

Apple, Strawberry and Lavender Flognarde

In anticipation of the upcoming Lavender Festival, I’ve been experimenting with my culinary lavender stash. Lately I seem to be stuck on flognardes because they are so darn good; so this week, it’s an Apple, Strawberry and Lavender Flognarde featuring tart Granny Smith apples and freshly picked sweet strawberries. A divine pairing.

apple, strawberry, lavender flognarde

INGREDIENTS

Fresh fruit – about 1-1/2 pounds, enough to adequately fill a shallow baking dish, overfilling a bit to allow for shrinkage
3 – 4 eggs depending on their size
1 cup organic milk or heavy cream
3/4 cup raw sugar*
1/2 cup unbleached flour
5 tablespoons butter melted
1 tablespoon vanilla
1/2 – 1 teaspoon culinary lavender

Optional: crème fraîche

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

Butter a shallow 2-quart baking dish. Wash and hull the strawberries, cut into halves or quarters and place into a glass bowl. Pour a few tablespoons of white wine over the berries and gently turn to mix. Let sit while preparing the apples. Wash, peel, quarter and core at least two apples. Slice half of the apples into thin wedges and dice the remainder into 1/4-inch thick pieces. Spread the strawberries over the bottom of the baking dish and then add the chopped apple pieces, stirring gently to combine. Arrange the apples slices in a circle over the top of the fruit.

In a blender, combine eggs, milk, sugar, flour, butter, vanilla and lavender; blend until smooth. Pour egg mixture over the fruit. Dust the top with a little lavender sugar, cinnamon or nutmeg if desired. Bake the flognarde in the upper third of the preheated oven until puffed and set to the touch in the center, 55 to 65 minutes. Serve warm.

Mix 1/4 teaspoon lavender into a small bowl crème fraîche. Mix well. Serve each slice of flognard with dollop of lavender crème fraîche.

* If you are using any apple other than Granny Smith, or using substituting any other fruit, reduce the sugar to 1/2 cup.

Rhubarb, Strawberry & Raspberry Flognarde

Don’t you love summer – when our gardens and the farmer’s markets are replete with fresh fruits and veggies? Today’s recipe is a flognarde made with freshly harvested fruits right out of the garden topped with a dollop of whipped coconut cream. Elegant, easy and fabulously delicious. There were no leftovers. One of my dinner guests declared that I was now in charge of making her a flognarde once per week. Ha!

INGREDIENTS

Fresh fruit, rinsed (I used a combination of rhubarb, strawberries and raspberries – about 1-1/2 pounds, enough to adequately fill a shallow baking dish, overfilling a bit to allow for shrinkage)
3 large eggs
1 cup organic heavy cream
3/4 cup raw sugar
1/2 cup unbleached flour
5 tablespoons butter melted
1 tablespoon vanilla

Optional coconut whipped cream:

1 can full-fat coconut milk
2-3 tablespoons homemade powdered confectioner’s sugar made from cane sugar*

PREPARATION

The day before:

Chill a can of full-fat coconut milk into the refrigerator for at least 24 hours. The top layer of opaque “cream” is what you will be whipping.

*To prepare the powdered sugar, grind cane sugar in a blender for 3-4 minutes until there are no sugar crystals remaining. Set aside in an airtight container until ready to use.

The day of:

Preheat the oven to 325 degrees.

Butter a shallow 2-quart baking dish. Wash rhubarb and remove the leaves and the thickened ends. Cut rhubarb into 1/4-inch thick pieces and spread out in greased baking dish. Wash and hull strawberries, cut into quarters and spread out over the rhubarb. Gently wash raspberries and carefully place over the top of the strawberries and rhubarb.

In a blender, combine eggs, milk, sugar, flour, butter and vanilla; blend until smooth. Pour egg mixture over the fruit. Bake the flognarde in the upper third of the preheated oven until puffed and set to the touch in the center, 55 to 65 minutes. Serve warm with a dollop of whipped coconut cream.

To make the whipped coconut cream:

Open the can of chilled coconut milk without shaking it or turning upside down and carefully spoon out the top layer of opaque, thickened milk that has gathered at the top of the can into a mixing bowl. Leave the syrupy looking translucent liquid in the can (reserve for use in other recipes or your morning smoothie). Add 2-3 tablespoons of powdered confectioners sugar to the thickened milk. Using a hand mixer, whip the coconut milk until creamy: start on low and then increase to a higher speed, moving the beater up and down and around to infuse the mixture with as much air as possible. Note: Coconut cream is best used right after it is whipped although it actually holds up fairly in the fridge.

 

If You Like Cauliflower, This Contest is For You!

Yippee! I’ve just finished outlining my forthcoming e-cookbook. Its working title is “Mon Petit Chou-Fleur” (‘My Little Cauliflower’ in French). The concept is “Cauliflower: 30 Ways in 30 Days” and will feature 30 unique recipes that utilize cauliflower (appetizers, brunch/lunch, soups, sides, entrees and dessert), as well as information on how to buy, store, roast, grill, puree, etc.

You’re probably thinking “Cauliflower for dessert, yuck!” But guess what? You won’t even know you’re eating it! And better yet, neither will your kids ;)

Here’s the contest: What shall I name the ebook? Title suggestions are welcomed in the comment section, and if I choose yours, you win a free copy of the e-book!

(This is a mock-up cover for the sake of the post)

cauliflower-ebook-cover

Slow-roasted Rabbit with Blood Orange-Kumquat Gravy

I stopped by the Port Angeles Farmer’s Market this weekend to pick up a few winter vegetables and I was excited to find that Spring Rain Farms had rabbit – this is something I’ve never tackled before, and I was ready for a new challenge. My mom used to cook rabbit when we were kids, so why not give it a try?

I paired this fresh little bunny – my neighbor is sure his name was “Thumper” – with a bright, citrusy gravy made from pan drippings, the juice of blood oranges and kumquats. Delicious!

 

rabbit-with-blood-orange-gravy

INGREDIENTS

1 wild rabbit, jointed into legs, shoulders and saddle
1/4 cup gluten free flour, seasoned with sea salt and thyme
1/2 cup extra-virgin duck fat, (you can use olive oil)
3 garlic cloves, peeled and minced
2 large shallots, peeled and sliced
3/4 cup red wine (I used Cabernet Sauvignon)
The juice of 3 blood oranges
Handful of kumquats

PREPARATION

Prepare the rabbit by cutting into five pieces.*

Use a large Dutch oven or roasting pan – one that will fit all the meat. Dredge the rabbit pieces in the seasoned flour, tap off the excess and then, over medium heat, brown the pieces one or two at a time in a few tablespoons of fat or oil. Once all of the pieces are nicely browned, remove to a plate draped with paper towel and set aside for a few moments.

To the pot, add the shallots, garlic and all of the duck fat or olive oil. Really, all of it, think confit! Add the wine and mix well. Fit all the pieces back in the pan and bring the mixture up to a boil, then partially cover with a lid, and allow everything to simmer vigorously for 2 hours. Check the moisture level every 30 minutes or so, adding a tiny bit of fat or wine as needed. Turn the rabbit pieces over several times during the cooking process.

Towards the end of the cooking time, halve the blood oranges and juice them. Slice the kumquats and remove all seeds. Set aside.

After about two hours, the sauce should be thickened and the rabbit should easily come away from the bones. Transfer the rabbit to a serving plate, drape lightly with foil and set aside in a warm oven. De-glaze the pot with the juice from the blood oranges. Add in the sliced kumquats, stirring well to get all of the browned and crispy meat bits off the bottom of the Dutch oven and then let it cook down until thickened.

Top the rabbit pieces with the blood orange-kumquat gravy and serve with buttery baked sweet potatoes and a fresh green salad.

Bon appetit!

*How to Cut Up a Rabbit

The following tips are from Gene Gerrard, Meat & Wild Game Cooking Expert.

Like all game meats, rabbit is very lean, and the more worked muscles, like the legs, take longer time to cook than the saddle (the breast meat), which cooks relatively quickly. Rabbit legs need to be braised or stewed to tenderness and should be separated from the saddle. In general, a rabbit is cut up into 5 serving pieces: four legs and the saddle. You’ll need a sharp chef’s knife, a sharp paring or boning knife and kitchen shears. You can also use a cleaver to do some of the whacking work that your chef’s knife will do.

Cut Forelegs. Lay the rabbit on its back. Hold a foreleg in one hand, then keeping your knife flush against the rib cage, cut the flesh connecting the foreleg to the shoulder. The foreleg isn’t connected to bone, so this is easy to do. Repeat with the other foreleg.

Cut Hind Legs. Removing the hind legs is similar to removing chicken legs. Push down on the rabbit’s spine to give you clear sight of the thigh muscle connecting to the pelvis. Cut through the thigh, exposing the ball joint of the thigh bone. Bend it back so the ball joint pops out. Cut the meat around the leg, turning the carcass, to separate the leg from the tail joint. Repeat with the other hind leg.

Remove Pelvis. There’s little meat on the pelvis, so it’s best to just chop it off and throw it into your stockpot or saucepan for stock or sauce. Count two ribs up from the tail, and using your cleaver or chef’s knife, chop between the second and third ribs. If you’re using a chef’s knife, press down on the back of the knife with your palm and push downward. You can use shears or your boning knife to completely separate the pelvis. This cut will release the flap meat on either side of the carcass.

Cut Down Backbone. Turn the carcass spine-side up, then press down and flatten the spine with the palm of your hand. Using the cleaver, cut the carcass in half horizontally down the spine. Again, you can use your chef’s knife, but you’ll need more pressure to run the knife down the spine, cracking the rib bones as you go. As you would do for cutting up a chicken, use kitchen shears to cut out the back bone on both sides of the carcass. Save the back bone for soup stock or sauce.

Quarter the Saddle. Using the cleaver or chef’s knife, cut across the saddle horizontally just below the saddle where the flap meat is connected. Cut this lower portion in half vertically. Cut the upper portion of the saddle in half vertically, which now gives you four saddle portions.

Your rabbit is now cut up and ready to cook!

Savory Grain Free Waffles with Shallot and Bacon

I’ve been thinking about making savory grain free waffles incorporating caramelized shallots and bacon for awhile now and what I finally came up with is a dense, flavorful waffle with a slight nuttiness from the cashew butter, just waiting for whatever topping you care to dream up. Today I settled for butter and pure maple syrup but next time I’m going to step it up and top the waffles with Canadian bacon, a poached egg and Hollandaise sauce!

savory waffles

INGREDIENTS

3 eggs
3/4 cup raw cashew butter
3 tablespoons almond or coconut milk
1-2 teaspoons liquid fat (melted bacon fat, melted butter or avocado oil)
1/4 teaspoons salt
3/4 teaspoons baking soda
3 tablespoons tapioca flour
1 piece of thick-sliced bacon, diced
1 small shallot, minced
1/4 teaspoons minced garlic

PREPARATION

In a small skillet, sauté the garlic and shallot in 1 tablespoon of butter over medium-low heat until translucent, about 4 minutes. Add the bacon to the skillet and cook until just done. Set aside – do not drain fat off.

Preheat the waffle iron.

Using a handheld electric mixer or a fork, beat the eggs with the cashew butter and milk until fairly smooth. If there are not two teaspoons of fat in the bacon-shallot pan, then add melted fat or oil to make up the difference.

Mix the salt, baking soda and tapioca flour in a small bowl, then pour the dry ingredients into the wet mixture. Beat for 30 seconds until all ingredients are fully combined, scraping the bottom of the bowl to make sure all of the sticky cashew butter gets incorporated.

Fold the chopped bacon and shallots into the batter by hand.

Cook waffles according to the instructions on your waffle iron. Note: Every machine is different, so watch the waffles carefully to ensure they don’t scorch. This batter will not take as long to cook as a regular waffles and will likely be done before your indicator light turns green. Once the steam stops, they are done. Mine took about 3 minutes per waffle.

Serve with butter and real maple syrup or get fancy and top with a poached egg, a slice of Canadian bacon and a little Hollandaise sauce (recipe follows).

Makes three waffles.

Hollandaise Sauce

INGREDIENTS

3 eggs yolks
1 tablespoon lemon juice
1/2 teaspoon sea salt
1/8 teaspoon paprika
1/2 cup melted butter or 4 tablespoons melted coconut oil

PREPARATION

Place the egg yolks, lemon juice, sea salt, paprika and pepper in a blender and mix for about 10 seconds.

Set the blender on medium speed and slowly pour in the butter or coconut oil. It should thicken very quickly.

Meyer Lemon Budino with Persimmon Cream

I love Meyer lemons and am always excited for the time of year when they are available. Today, I’m making a Meyer Lemon Budino. Budino is a sweet Italian dish, usually rich and creamy like a custard or pudding; and with the leftover lemons, I’ll be making my Meyer Lemon Roast Chicken.

Last week while watching Master Chef Junior, the kids were tasked with making Key Lime pies. One of the contestants served his with persimmon meringue, which I thought sounded really interesting, so I created a whipped cream version using coconut milk as a topping for the Budino.

budino with persimmon cream

INGREDIENTS

1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons organic coconut palm sugar
3 large eggs, separated
1/4 cup gluten free flour
1/4 cup plus 2 tablespoons fresh Meyer lemon juice
2 tablespoons Meyer lemon zest (three Meyer lemons)
3/4 cup full fat coconut milk

1/4 teaspoon salt
Whipped persimmon-coconut cream (optional)

PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 350° degrees F. Butter one small baking dish or six 3/4-cup ramekins. Combine 1/2 cup sugar, egg yolks, flour, lemon juice, and lemon peel in large bowl; whisk until well blended. Whisk in milk.

Using electric mixer, beat egg whites and salt in medium bowl until frothy. Gradually add remaining 2 tablespoons sugar and beat until soft peaks form. Fold beaten egg whites into lemon mixture in 2 additions. Transfer lemon mixture into prepared baking dish or divide mixture among prepared ramekins. Place baking dish or ramekins in roasting pan. Pour enough hot water into roasting pan to come halfway up sides of dish(es). Bake pudding(s) until top’s are golden and spring back when lightly touched, about 50 minutes for small baking dish and 30-35 minutes for ramekins. Note: during the last 10 minutes of baking, I loosely draped a sheet of foil over the budino so it wouldn’t get too dark. It already looked dark because of the type of sugar that I used. Remove roasting pan from oven and then carefully lift the baking dish or ramekins out of the hot water.

Serve the budino warm or cold with whipped persimmon coconut cream, if desired. I dusted the whipped cream with a little Divine Desserts, an aromatic blend of spices that includes fennel pollen, dried ground orange peel, lemon grass powder, cayenne pepper, sour plum powder, star anise, cinnamon, nutmeg, cardamom, ginger, vanilla powder, ground clove and coriander.

meyer lemon budino

Persimmon Coconut Cream

INGREDIENTS

Pulp from 1-2 persimmons (optional)
1-2 tablespoons raw honey, depending on if you want sweet
1 can full-fat coconut cream, pre-refrigerated for at least 24 hours
Pollen Ranch Divine Desserts Blend (optional)

PREPARATION

Roughly chop up an over-ripe or soft persimmon and put the pieces into a fine-mesh strainer. With the strainer hanging over a small bowl, smash persimmon pieces with the back of a wooden spoon, forcing the pulp/juice through. If you don’t have a fine-mesh strainer, use a colander, although you may need to puree the pulp in a blender to smooth it out. Stir the honey into the persimmon puree. (You can skip this step if you don’t want to include persimmon or they are out of season).

Open the can of chilled coconut milk without shaking it or turning upside down and carefully spoon out the top layer of opaque, thickened milk that has gathered at the top of the can into a mixing bowl. Leave the syrupy looking translucent liquid in the can (reserve for use in other recipes or your morning smoothie).

Using a hand mixer, whip the coconut milk until stiff peaks form: start on low and then increase to a higher speed, moving the beater up and down and around to infuse the mixture with as much air as possible. Gently fold in the persimmon/honey mixture. Note: If you are not including persimmon, then be sure to add the honey directly into the whipped cream while whipping; you can also use 2-3 tablespoons homemade powdered confectioner’s sugar made from cane sugar.* Coconut cream is best used right after it is whipped although it actually holds up fairly in the fridge.

*To prepare the powdered sugar, grind cane sugar in a blender for 3-4 minutes until there are no sugar crystals remaining. Set aside in an airtight container until ready to use.

Banana Mulberry Muffins

These grain-free, super moist banana mulberry muffins were inspired by the delicious Carrot Muffins that I made last week. Today’s muffins, lush with fragrance from the bananas, mulberries and spicy cardamom, are sure to be the star at breakfast or as a healthy afternoon snack.

I added raw, organic, sun-dried white mulberries, which are chewy, delicious and taste similar to a fig. Mulberries are high in protein and fiber and are an excellent source of iron, vitamin C, calcium, and Resveratrol – a powerful antioxidant – which is also found in red wine. If you can’t find mulberries, you can substitute dried cranberries, apricots, raisins, or currants – or skip the fruit and add your favorite nut, chopped into small bits.

banana mulberry muffins

INGREDIENTS

1/3 cup almond meal
2 tablespoons flax meal
2 tablespoons tapioca flour
1/2 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/2 teaspoon cardamom
Pinch of sea salt
1-1/2 cups mashed bananas (3 overripe bananas)
3 eggs
1/4 cup or less Tupelo raw honey
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup butter, melted
2-3 tablespoons dried mulberries

PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a small bowl, combine the almond and flax meals, tapioca flour, baking soda, cinnamon, cardamom and salt. Mix with a fork to combine.

In a separate bowl, mash the bananas with the back of a fork. Then whisk in the eggs, honey, vanilla and melted butter.

Grease a 12-well muffin tin with oil or butter or line the wells with paper liners.

Combine the wet and dry mixtures and stir in the mulberries.

Carefully pour or spoon the batter into the muffin tins, filling each well to two-thirds full.

Bake for 20-22 minutes until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

Let cool before serving. Makes 12 muffins.

These muffins are very moist, so best if stored in the refrigerator.

Carrot Muffins

These grain-free carrot muffins are moist and delicious; perfect for breakfast alongside a poached egg, or as a nice after school snack for hungry youngsters. I used dried cherries, but you could substitute dried cranberries, raisins, or currants – or skip the fruit and add your favorite nut, chopped into small bits. You could also use shredded zucchini or apple instead of the carrots.

These muffins are super moist, so best if stored in the refrigerator. They can also be frozen, although they are so yummy, good luck trying to save any!

carrot muffins

INGREDIENTS

1/4 cup almond meal
1 tablespoon flax meal
1/4 teaspoon baking soda
1 teaspoon cinnamon
1/4 teaspoon cardamom
Pinch of salt
2 eggs
1/4 cup raw, local honey
1 tablespoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup organic butter, melted
1 cup carrots, shredded (2 large carrots)
1/4 cup dried cherries

PREPARATION

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

In a small bowl, combine the almond and flax meals, baking soda, cinnamon, cardamom and salt. Mix with a fork to combine.

In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, honey, vanilla and butter.

Grease a 12-well muffin tin with oil or line the wells with paper liners.

Combine the wet and dry mixtures and stir in the cherries and carrots.

Spoon the mixture into the muffin tins, filling each well to two-thirds full.

Bake for 16-18 minutes until a toothpick inserted comes out clean.

Let cool before serving. Makes 9 muffins.